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DNA Analysis of the 3,800-year-old Japanese Woman's Face Reconstructed

            

For the first time, researchers animated a woman who lived in the period of Jōmon Ceramic Culture (BC 8000-BC 300) by removing most of the uncertainties by the DNA analysis.

The project team, which also houses scientists from the National Museum of Nature in Tokyo's Ueno district, displayed this remarkable reconstruction on March 12.

The analyzed DNA was taken from the female's minor teeth, which were thought to have lived in Jōmon period about 3,800 years ago. The skeletal remains of the woman, including the skull, were revealed in the historic site of Funadomari on Rebunto Island in Hokkaido.

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The gene analysis carried out on DNA gave information about the determinative facial features of the woman, such as skin and eye color

Scientists have explained that women have a brighter test and lighter brownish eyes compared to today's people in Japan. Unlike today's Japanese, it is said that the skin of the skin and the thin, curly hair structure are particularly striking.

Skull of Jomon woman in Rebunto Island of Hokkaido. A DNA sample was taken from the molar tooth to determine the skin, hair and eye color. C: Tetsu Kobayashi

The team also confirms that the woman is about 140 cm in height and carries a blood group

Conventional facial reconstructions are based on the physical characteristics of the skull. Researchers have noted that this Japanese woman, aged 3,800 years, assumed the skin and eye color based on modern human qualities.

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According to the team's claim, genetic information offers a more accurate reconstruction possibility.

Kenichi Shinoda, President of the Department of Anthropology at the National Museum of Nature, says, "When reconstruction based on imagination is supported with concrete information as it is now, it is possible to reconstruct a fairly accurate reconstruction."

The 3,800-year-old Japanese woman's reconstruction is displayed right next to her real skull. C: Tetsu Kobayashi

The reconstructed model and project proposal will be exhibited at the exhibition "Body: Forcing the Boundaries of the Unknown", which will run from March 13th to June 17th.

The exhibition is organized by The Asahi Shimbun, one of Japan's most respected newspapers.


asahi.co. March 12, 2018.

            

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