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At the end of the Glacial Age, people witnessed huge fires

            

Approximately 12,800 years ago, humanity had witnessed giant fires that shattered 10% of the Earth, in other words 10 million square kilometers, due to comet falling pieces.

On a sultry day, about 12,800 years ago, the earth was awakened from the winter sleep that lay hundreds of years ago, and the glacier came out of the world. The glaciers began to warm up,

Then the sky was suddenly covered with flaming fire. Jerky shock waves followed the fireballs.

The flames soon covered up, and a dense cloud of dust filled the chest. It was impossible to see the daylight from the rising smoke. Then the climate became colder, the plants died, the food resources were exhausted, and the glaciers began to rise again. The ocean currents changed direction, making the climate colder, plus a thousand years more like a glacier-like one.

( The Single Ice Age of Man: Pleistocene Period )

Eventually, the climate began to wake up again to the world, to humankind again, a lesser big animal, and a human cultura that left spearheads of completely different species behind in North America.

This fairytale narrative is supported by a very comprehensive study on geochemical and isotopic signs in the journal Journal of Geology .

The results of the research were so extensive that it had to be divided into two different parts.

The results of the research titled "Part I: Ice Core and Glaciers" and "Part II: Lake, Sea and Land Sediments", "Extraordinary Biomass-Young Dryas Period, Fire Caused by Cosmic Collision, and Post-Collision Winter-12,800 Years Ago" divided into two parts.

Among his twenty-four writers is Professor Brian Thomas, professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Kansas, Professor Adrian Melott, who completed his doctorate in Kansas University in 2005 and is currently working at Washburn University.

( At the end of the last Ice Age, the European population experienced a sudden change )

Melott states that the research is based on measurements made in 170 different areas around the world

In the light of information obtained from researchers at the University of Kansas, the disastrous disaster, the remains of which are scattered about 100 kilometers across the globe that still circumnavigates the Solar System, has hit the earth.

Melott says that the assumption is that a large-sized comet has disintegrated, the disintegrated parts are hitting the earth and leading to this cataclysm. According to the research, a number of different chemical symptoms, including carbon dioxide, nitrate, ammonia and others, indicate that 10% of terrestrial areas, about 10 million square kilometers, are exposed to the giant fire

( Pottery Growth Increase at the End of the Last Ice Age Could Be Cultural )

According to Melott, pollen analyzes reveal that pine forests have been damaged by leaving the fire to poplar forests, a species of tree that has spread through the cleaned area

Researchers believe that this cosmic collision led to cold climate conditions in the Late Dryas period, biomass burns, the disappearance of certain species in the Late Pleistocene Age, "changes in population and changes in human culture"

Melott says that the cosmic crusher damages the ozone layer, causing an increase in skin cancer and creating adverse health conditions. "The assumption about collision is still only a proposition, but this research has provided us with a significant amount of evidence that the existence of this evidence can only be explained by a great cosmic collision," says Melott.


Science Daily. 1 February 2018.

Article 1: Wendy S. Wolbach, Joanne P. Ballard, Paul A. Mayewski, Victor Adedeji, Ted E. Bunch, Richard B. Firestone, Timothy A. French, George A. Howard, Isabel Israde- Alcantara, John R. Johnson, David Kimbel, Charles R. Kinzie, Andrei Kurbatov, Gunther Kletetschka, Malcolm A. LeCompte, William C. Mahaney, Adrian L. Melott, Abigail Maiorana-Boutilier, Siddhartha Mitra, Christopher R. Moore, William M. Napier, Jennifer Parlier, Kenneth B. Tankersley, Brian C. Thomas, James H. Wittke, Allen West, James P. Kennett. Extraordinary Biomass-Burning Episode and Impact Winter Triggered by the Younger Dryas Cosmic Impact ~ 12,800 Years Ago. 1. Ice Cores and Glaciers . The Journal of Geology, 2018.

Article 2: Wendy S. Wolbach, Joanne P. Ballard, Paul A. Mayewski, Andrew C. Parnell, Niamh Cahill, Victor Adedeji, Ted E. Bunch, Gabriela Domínguez-Vázquez, Jon M. Erlandson, Richard B. Firestone, Timothy A. French, George Howard, Isabel Israde-Alcántara, John R. Johnson, David Kimbel, Charles R. Kinzie, Andrei Kurbatov, Gunther Kletetschka, Malcolm A. LeCompte, William C. Mahaney, Adrian L. Melott, Siddhartha Mitra, Abigail Maiorana-Boutilier, Christopher R. Moore, William M. Napier, Jennifer Parlier, Kenneth B. Tankersley, Brian C. Thomas, James H. Wittke, Allen West, James P. Kennett. Extraordinary Biomass-Burning Episode and Impact Winter Triggered by the Younger Dryas Cosmic Impact ~ 12,800 Years Ago. 2. Lake, Marine, and Terrestrial Sediments . The Journal of Geology, 2018.

            

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